How to Become a Leader Developing Machine

Leadership Development

Few leaders that I encounter reproduce themselves successfully on a regular basis. Some have never even done it once. One of the questions that I am asked most often is, “How can I be more effective at developing leaders?”

My friend Bob Logan, who will be guest-posting here later this week, taught me the following formula many years ago. A commitment to this 5 step Leadership Development Cycle just might transform you into a leader developing machine. Implement this Leadership Development Cycle for successful delegation, training assistants, teaching kids, developing preachers, and building leaders in almost any area.

The Leadership Development Cycle

1.  I Do – You Watch

Rather than doing everything yourself, tackle projects and tasks with someone at your side.  Allow your sidekick to watch you prepare to teach, work through a project, or organize something.  You may bring one of your kids into the kitchen while you cook dinner or have a potential communicator sit with you while you work through the stages of preparation.  Explain along the way what you are doing.

2.  I Do – You Help

The Leadership Cycle continues as you allow the one who has watched to step in and help.  It takes a conscious decision to not do everything yourself.

3.  You Do – I Help

In stage three, you stop cracking the eggs in the kitchen and allow another to lead the project.  It’s time to let go, but critically important that you not disappear!  While another person leads, and you help, you must be just as present and time committed as before.  The difference now is that you are assisting rather than leading.

4.  You Do – I Watch and Encourage

You’re almost there,  but a person is not fully trained until you watch them lead the way and give them feedback. Encouragement and appropriate correction will help the new leader excel going forward.  A communicator that you have launched may need a year of feedback and encouragement.  A young apprentice will need encouragement and feedback while still developing.

5.  You Do – Someone Else Watches

Time to bring it home.  For true exponential leadership development, build into your trainee the importance of repeating this cycle themselves.

What are you learning about leadership development and delegation? Leave a Comment!

 

Posted by Brian Howard

My focus is to help YOU move forward one step at a time. I write about church excellence, personal productivity, and family leadership. I coach leaders, start churches, and help organizations break growth barriers. My goal is to draw on this experience to help YOU move forward in life, leadership, and productivity.

  1. We used a shorter version in medical school for learning to do procedures… “See One. Do One. Teach One.”!

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  2. One of the things that I learned was successful was – about a year ago I was involved in leading a small group with the use of a co-facilitator. After leading the small group for about one year, I asked the co-facilitator to begin leading. This required the co-facilitator to lead in ways not previously within his comfort zone. But my leadership abilities to encourage this person as well as compliment their efforts really appeared to pay dividends. The experience became a success story for him to observe in ‘real time’. This is leadership but it’s also discipleship….giving others opportunity to be trusted and trained in areas where they have potential but have not fully realized their abilities. God is good, gracious, and kind. We can be too.

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  3. Helpful post Brian. Thanks!

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  4. […] few weeks of training a new assistant, commit to investing several hours weekly in training. Follow the Leader Development Cycle as you train: I do – You watch; I do – You help, You do – I help, You do – I […]

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  5. […] later.  Invest the time to train well and communicate clearly with your assistant. Follow the Leadership Development Cycle. Be patient and allow your assistant to learn how to work well with […]

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